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"When you drop a glass or a plate to the ground, it makes a loud crashing sound. When a window shatters, a table leg breaks, or when a picture falls off the wall, it makes a noise. But as for your heart, when that breaks, it’s completely silent. You would think that for something so important, it would make the loudest noise in the whole world, or even have some sort of ceremonious sound like the gong of a symbol or the ringing of a bell. But it’s silent and you almost wish there was a noise to distract you from the pain."

- Cecelia Ahern, If You Could See Me Now (via larmoyante)

(via thatwhorenextdoor)

ignitionremix:

it’s a beautiful day to give me money

(via trust)

"Learn to say ‘no’ without explaining yourself."

- Unknown (via extrahopeless)

(Quelle: j-term, via fackinggcody)

hoodratzayn:

i believe in hate at first sight

(Quelle: jadethrwall, via retiredjesus)

releasings:

my mum likes to play this game called yell from 4 rooms away and get upset when i can’t hear her

(Quelle: releasings, via retiredjesus)

"

"When I was about 20 years old, I met an old pastor’s wife who told me that when she was young and had her first child, she didn’t believe in striking children, although spanking kids with a switch pulled from a tree was standard punishment at the time. But one day, when her son was four or five, he did something that she felt warranted a spanking–the first in his life. She told him that he would have to go outside himself and find a switch for her to hit him with.

The boy was gone a long time. And when he came back in, he was crying. He said to her, “Mama, I couldn’t find a switch, but here’s a rock that you can throw at me.”

All of a sudden the mother understood how the situation felt from the child’s point of view: that if my mother wants to hurt me, then it makes no difference what she does it with; she might as well do it with a stone.

And the mother took the boy into her lap and they both cried. Then she laid the rock on a shelf in the kitchen to remind herself forever: never violence. And that is something I think everyone should keep in mind. Because if violence begins in the nursery one can raise children into violence.”

"

- Astrid Lindgren, author of Pippi Longstocking, 1978 Peace Prize Acceptance Speech (via creatingaquietmind)

(Quelle: jillymomcraftypants, via creatingaquietmind)